Installation view, 2021. Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, In My Room. Courtesy of Humber Street Gallery and the artists. © Jules Lister

In My Room, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings

Hannah Quinlan and Rosie Hastings’ first institutional exhibition develops the artists’ study of politics, histories and aesthetics of queer spaces and culture.

“In My Room”, a new film, highlights the impact of gentrification upon the city and its gay communities, whilst also exploring the relationship between masculinity, capitalism and power. Wall rubbings of the stone relief that fronted the recently closed Bar Jester in Birmingham’s gay village are also presented as unique works on paper.
A major fresco painting depicts a high street populated by pedestrians, which considers the role urban architecture plays in the formation of identities.

Commissioned by Focal Point Gallery, In My Room is presented in partnership with MOSTYN and Humber Street Gallery.

To download and read more about the works exhibited, click below:

Hannah Quinlan and Rosie Hastings in conversation wish Rosanna Mclaughlin

Rosanna Mclaughlin speaks with artists Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings about the works within the exhibition, as well as further expanding some of the broader themes being explored by the artists.

Now You See Me, a critical essay by Rosanna Mclaughlin

Expanding on the conversation with Hannah Quinlan and Rosie Hastings, writer Rosanna Mclaughlin’s accompanying essay discusses their show In My Room, the importance of queer spaces and the politics of gay culture. This essay was originally commissioned by Focal Point Gallery.

In My Room: Hull Queer Space Stories

In response to In My Room we launched a new community outreach and digital campaign, collecting LGBTQI+ stories through the human history of Hull’s queer club and bar spaces.

Bars such as Silhouettes, Polar Bear, Yorkshireman and Frankie’s Vauxhall Tavern may be gone, but the lived histories of LGBTQI+ life in these spaces lives on in the memories of the clientele, the owners, their families, the bar staff, the drag queens, and performers. As we progress towards a greater sense of LGBTQI+ acceptance, how has the landscape of queer space adapted to new challenges and austerity? We asked what has been gained? What has been lost? And who is fighting to preserve our queer heritage?

We worked with local artist in the LGBTQI+ community Kerrie Marsh to transform the stories and contributions into a creative piece of work that you can look at and listen to below:

Rainbow Brick Road

Let Kerrie Marsh take you on a journey through this colourful publication.

You can also listen to it on Soundcloud.

Related Events

Found me // 3am: A performance by Sayang

Thursday 9 September 2021
7-9pm
Humber Street Gallery
Free and open for all
Booking not required

Responding to the exhibition In My Room, on display at Humber Street Gallery until September, the artist and DJ, Sayang, will debut a live audio-visual installation in our café. Using modular synthesis and hardware, they’ll create an immersive experience that embodies the ‘before, during and after’ emotions of freedom, sense of self and evolution of queer parties. Channelling their experiences, the set will be rooted in ambience and atmosphere, with glimpses of ecstasy and euphoria.

Sayang will perform within a fabric structure surrounded and covered by visuals created in collaboration with filmmaker Tony Lee. Merging sound and vision, Tony’s visuals embrace, amplify and channel Sayang’s experiences and the QTIPoC*, Trans and queer Disabled bodies and minds they see themself in and stands on the shoulders of in queer party spaces.

*Queer, Trans and/or Intersex People of Colour

 

Date
1 July – 12 September 2021

Location
Space 1, Humber Street Gallery

FREE

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